Fly Fishing Fabisch, the Weekly Picture Archive 2 - 2017

Weekly pictures Archive 2017two


Weekly pictures archive 2017 part two

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The weekly picture archive at Fabisch Fly Fishing part two 2017. Collected pictures in 2017 - 2 from the areas fly fishing, fly tying and nature. This pictures were taken in Europe, North America including Canada.

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Lakes and Ponds in Western Canada

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Lake in West Canada

weekly picture 15 2017

A trip from Europe to Western Canada is always an exciting event. The first couple of times people tend to think they had forgotten something very important without being able to think of just what that was. This may be true for other trips, too, but for most trips you don´t spend twelve hours aboard a plane. Just a little farther and you´re at Russia´s back door. What´s it going to be like over there? Will the Indians - pardon me, the members of the First Nations - want to roast you or will they be friendly? I´m still nervous with every new trip, but that´s part of the fun. Most travelers will have gathered information beforehand on the waters they intend to fish for their favorite prey.

Be it about salmon, steelhead or other salmonids, there´s always special information to take into account. Even different salmon species may run up the same river at different times. With all that info, anglers tend to forget to try out small lakes or ponds. There are even private lakes like the one on this picture. Fishing private lakes is not cheap, prices are usually around 40$ a day. The advantages are that these lakes are usually clean, and there is no high water due to runoff or rainfalls. Sometimes, even a boat is included in the fee. I got two rainbows, 4 and 6 pounds, on the lake on this photograph.

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Sometimes a very good alternative, a private lake


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Carnage on the River Wiesent

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Carnage on the Wiesent

weekly picture 16 2017

Sometime one wonders why fly fishers travel all the way to Canada, New Zealand or even Australia to flyfish. Frequently people (like myself) speak of pristine nature and wilderness. Believe me, you can find wilderness right here, on our home waters! OK, to get there we first had to name a notorious black bird "Bird of the Year". Then we had to protect him, to pet him etc. until we got a stable, and rapidly growing, population.

This bird doesn´d need to be fed. It can find all the food it needs among the trout and grayling populations in our streams and rivers. Of course we´re supposed to restock new fish in spring so it won´t starve next winter. The calm parts of the Wiesent seem to be suffering from a complete absence of fish this spring, but we do have shiny, fat, saturated cormorants. Unfortunately, the photograph is a bit blurred, but you can picture what´s going on on the river when the cormorant is hunting. Doesn´t anyone happen to have a Jeannie, who could end this nightmare with a wink?

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Cormorant busy on the Wiesent


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June = Green Drake Season? Not only, also for Stoneflies.

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Stonefly in the Alps

weekly picture 17 2017

On our chalk streams the green drake hatch is without doubt the year´s main spectacle. Although they are called mayflies over here, they usually hatch from the beginning to the end of June. Depending on the weather they may hatch a little sooner or a little later. During this hatch, huge trout that you usually don´t even see the rest of the year cruise just beneath the surface gorging themselves almost to exploding point. They are so focused on their prey that even a fly line cast right in front of them is ignored. They might just as well, however, ignore many of the patterns offered by excited fly fishers. With all that green drake hype anglers tend to forget another big event on our rivers, mainly in the Alps and alpine promontories.

Yes, it´s stoneflies I´m talking about. These flies come from ancient populations supposedly living since dinosaurs roamed the earth. Huge specimens of 5 to 6 cm are tumbling through the air rather than flying. These flies love freestone rivers better than chalk streams. Fortunately for fish and anglers, stonefly nymphs are available all year round. Whereas green drake nymphs build little holes to live in, most stonefly nymphs live on the river bottom, only very few in the substrate.

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Perla, A Beautiful Alpine Stonefly


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Long Roll Cast on the Pegnitz

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Rollcast on the Pegnitz

weekly picture 19 2017

On Flyfishers´ meetings surprising things may come up. As soon as a few flyfishers get together on the river or on a meadow, the discussion is about different casts, or flies, or... Last weekend, at the EFFA-On-Tour-Meeting on the upper Neckar, many avid flyfishers got together. Be it beginners or experienced instructors, the goal is to execute the cast as simply as possible, as long as optimum precision is achieved. That´s the way to get the best possible result.

The photograph was taken during my annual flyfishing meeting in Velden on the Pegnitz. In this spot, it isn´t exactly easy to get to the other side of the Pegnitz with a roll cast. To make it even less easy, the space for your back cast is a bit limited. At the end of the tippet there´s is a bead head nymph, because if you make it to the other side, you might as well fool a fish into taking your fly. There´s no lack of fellow anglers wishing to know all about the cast. A few meters away, you may try yourself how it works.

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A Long Roll Cast On The Pegnitz, With Friends


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Flyfishing on the Wiesent

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Nice Wiesent grayling

weekly picture 20 2017

Anyone having a access to one of Franconia´s better rivers, like the Pegnitz or the Wiesent, can consider himself lucky. Most stretches on these rivers are in private hands, as is our beat on the Wiesent downstream from Pretzfeld. Only 12 more km to go to the river´s mouth, our beat contains already almost all tributaries. Thus the mean flow is a considerable 8,5 m³/s. There are only a few spots that permit a crossing in chest waders.

Even though the Wiesent has been hard-hit by cormorants, a few fish have survived the winter. Those black birds don´t love the fast-flowing parts. A few weeks from now the green drake hatch will enable us to figure out how many fish have survived the last hard winter. When all the fish are rising you can see how many of them are still around. Last week I managed to fool the grayling on the photograph with a nymph, which isn´t a bad sign after all. Unortunately, especially grayling are frequently victimized by cormorants.

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Beautiful Wiesent-Grayling on a Nymph


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Alpine fly fishing

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alpine trout creek

weekly picture 21 2017

Flyfishing alpine waters presents anglers with many challenges. In fast-flowing waters you have to fish the pockets, the size of which may be as small as 25 cm. And, of course, you´re supposed to read them correctly. Then there are seemingly bottomless holes - anything but easy to fish. Especially when a pool of 3 m length has a depth of more than four meters. Foliage and rocks further limit your elbow space on top of it all. By the way, are you in shape?

The photograph shows the uppermost pool fish in the Saalach can reach. The waterfall marks the upper limit of the spawning runs for local salmonids. Whatever swims upstream from there has probably been stocked. During spawning season you can spot specimens of grayling and trout the size of which you wouldn´t believe if someone else told you. The deep holes are also home to huge brown trout that have no urge to migrate anywhere. These brown trout could match many a big steelhead. Food is available in abundance all year round. Sometimes I like to just watch aquatic life in spots like this without interfering in any way.

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A Dream of a River in the Alps


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Casting Classes on the Pegnitz

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Casting classes on the Pegnitz

weekly picture 22 2017

Today I have a bit of news about myself. It has now been over 30 years since I have first been allowed to use the Pegnitz in Velden for casting classes. So let me thank the town of Velden most cordially for their cooperation. The Pegnitz is very similar to the Wiesent. Like the Wiesent, the Pegnitz is a chalk stream and produces an enormous green-drake-hatch. For flyfishers, it is somewhat easier to handle than the Wiesent, as far as both walking along the banks and fishing is concerned. Although wading is not permitted, almost any spot can be fished with a fly rod.

In fly fishing, beginners should concentrate primarily on their cast, and not on their way. After first practicing with lots of available backcast space, the second block is taught with diverse obstacles behind the casters (see photograph). Once this situation has been mastered, dries are tied on for the first time. By then the first day of my fly fishing class will be near its end. In these classes scholars as a rule also catch fish, so the Pegnitz offers everything you might desire for your fly fishing clinic.

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Casting Practice with Obstacles on the Pegnitz


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Drifting On A Boat

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With a Driftboat

weekly picture 24 2017

There are many versions of boats for drifting downstream. Of course, all depends on what kind of water you want to navigate. Pontoon boats are very versatile, and they are available in a wide range of prices starting at around € 300.-. These boats are relatively light and very maneuverable and when you´re sitting on them normally no part of your body is immersed in the the water. If you intend to drift on larger rivers e.g. in Canada, you should be ready to invest a little more, especially if you plan on navigating remote areas for several days.

The quality of your equipment is not the only potential source of danger. Unfortunately for them, there are always oafs that start a trip down a river without thorough knowledge of its geography, and they might even do it alone. That´s pretty stupid even in Europe but even more so in Canada. There´s many a river valley that has a road in it, so you may have a chance of reaching someone in case you need help, but then there´s valleys where no one lives at all. Imagine drifting down one of those, into a canyon, and seeing and hearing a waterfall ahead... ! Better play it safe, just like on the photograph below, with a guide who knows his whereabouts.

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Drifting Safely On The Gold River In BC


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Where Are The Girls?

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Green drake on the Pegnitz

weekly picture 25 2017

The green drake hatch started early this year, so it´s almost all over already in our area. In the evening hours there are still some females flying to lay their eggs, and then fall on the surface as spinners, but the fish don´t seem to be very interested. So I could catch a nice brown (50 cm+) on a nymph, while dries didn´t seem very productive. Also, all my searches for mayfly nymphs in spring have indicated 2017 wouldn´t be the year for a spectacular green drake hatch.

Anyway, almost every year comes up with a special motif during the time of the green drake hatch. This photograph was taken during a flyfishing clinic in Velden on the Pegnitz. There hadn´t yet been any mating flights worth mentioning, and no egg-depositing flights either. Of all the mayflies spotted, ephemera danica (green drakes) were but a minority, the majority being ephemera vulgata. When I checked the sediment on the river bottom with my kitchen sieve looking for nymphs, my findings indicated that 2018 will be a much better year for green drakes. Until then, we´ll just have to make do without green drakes for a few months!

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Male Mayfly Looking For A Mate


Weekly picture main

The Weekly picture main page

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Weekly picture archive 2014

2014 part four

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Weekly picture archive 2015

2015 part one,   -   2015 part two,   -   2015 part three,   -   2015 part four

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Weekly picture archive 2016

2016 part one,   -   2016 part two,   -   2016 part three

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Weekly picture archive 2017

2017 part one,   -   2017 part two,   -   2017 part three,   -   2017 part four,   -   2017 part five

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Weekly picture archive 2018

2018 part one,   -   2018 part two,   -   2018 part three,   -   2018 part four,   -   2018 part five

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Weekly picture archive 2019

2019 part one,   -   2019 part two,   -   2019 part three,   -   2019 part four

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Wolfgang Fabisch,    Nürnberger Str. 45,    90542 Eckental/Germany

      ✆ DE   011 49 9126 288640,   Fax 011 49 9126 288643,     Ⓒ Wolfgang Fabisch